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25 Jul 2021 11:30:26 EDT (-0400)
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From: Thomas de Groot
Subject: Re: Complementary colours
Date: 29 May 2021 02:39:40
Message: <60b1e1ac$1@news.povray.org>
Op 28/05/2021 om 21:08 schreef Mr:
> Thomas de Groot <tho### [at] degrootorg> wrote:
>> Want to play with complementary colours? in rgb or srgb mode? Try this.
>> Nothing special, just messing around for a change, away from granites...
>>
>> --
>> Thomas
> 
> Inspiring ... could we get triadics? :-)
> 
Well... I do not want to open a can of worms here as I already did 
apparently ;-)

So maybe... but as I already mentioned earlier, I am just messing around 
to get something of a complementary (?) colour I can use and tweak as I 
want afterwards in a scene. Consider it the equivalent of pressing paint 
tubes on your palet and happily mixing the mess. :-) That is how I work, 
really.

This whole exercise does not go beyond that. No hidden or arcane intentions.

-- 
Thomas


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From: clipka
Subject: Re: Complementary colours
Date: 30 May 2021 07:45:50
Message: <60b37aee$1@news.povray.org>
Am 28.05.2021 um 23:16 schrieb Mike Horvath:

> An analog might be the major scale in music. The seven notes A to G are 
> not equidistant across an octave, yet they "sound nicer" (at least to 
> Westerners) so they are given greater weight/bias than the other five 
> tones. Dunno if it ultimately makes the life of someone learning music 
> for the first time easier or harder, though.

Bad example, because the science behind musical harmony is reasonably 
well understood. It all boils down to stuff the Pythagoreans already 
knew about, which is all about the frequency ratios.

The only complication is the invention of temperaments, which introduce 
a slight offset to just intonation to get some other benefits of musical 
expression.


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From: clipka
Subject: Re: Complementary colours
Date: 30 May 2021 08:03:13
Message: <60b37f01$1@news.povray.org>
Am 28.05.2021 um 23:04 schrieb Mike Horvath:

> Basically, the idea is that colors diametrically opposed on the RYB 
> color wheel "go well" with each other, and colors diametrically opposed 
> on the RGB color wheel tend to "clash" heavily. I'm not sure why this is 
> the case, and why the RYB color wheel "looks nice" (at least in Western 
> art).

I would argue that the perceived "clash" of complementary colors in the 
RGB system (highly saturated EGB colors, that is) is due to such colors 
NEVER EVER occurring besides each other in the natural world. They 
simply cannot. Because those extreme colours _per se_ can never be 
achieved reflectively from natural white-ish light.

For example, to get pure RGB red, you need to blast out red light in 
such a narrow spectral band, that the brightness within said band 
exceeds the brightness within the corresponding band of natural 
white-ish light.


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From: Bald Eagle
Subject: Re: Complementary colours
Date: 30 May 2021 09:05:00
Message: <web.60b38cc57910eb6d1f9dae3025979125@news.povray.org>
clipka <ano### [at] anonymousorg> wrote:

> Bad example, because the science behind musical harmony is reasonably
> well understood. It all boils down to stuff the Pythagoreans already
> knew about, which is all about the frequency ratios.
>
> The only complication is the invention of temperaments, which introduce
> a slight offset to just intonation to get some other benefits of musical
> expression.

Until you get into the really wild stuff of which 432 vs 440 is probably only
the tip of the iceberg. . .

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rt3EAPDn-Ug
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjR0WpWwLrE

For a flying pirouette into the deep end, clutch your energy crystals and
search: Rosslyn Chapel and you'll land firmly into Giza, Angkor Wat, Hypogeum
territory.


Meanwhile, decades later, millions are still endlessly amused by "more cowbell!"


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From: Mike Horvath
Subject: Re: Complementary colours
Date: 30 May 2021 20:16:04
Message: <60b42ac4$1@news.povray.org>
On 5/30/2021 8:03 AM, clipka wrote:
> Am 28.05.2021 um 23:04 schrieb Mike Horvath:
> 
>> Basically, the idea is that colors diametrically opposed on the RYB 
>> color wheel "go well" with each other, and colors diametrically 
>> opposed on the RGB color wheel tend to "clash" heavily. I'm not sure 
>> why this is the case, and why the RYB color wheel "looks nice" (at 
>> least in Western art).
> 
> I would argue that the perceived "clash" of complementary colors in the 
> RGB system (highly saturated EGB colors, that is) is due to such colors 
> NEVER EVER occurring besides each other in the natural world. They 
> simply cannot. Because those extreme colours _per se_ can never be 
> achieved reflectively from natural white-ish light.
> 
> For example, to get pure RGB red, you need to blast out red light in 
> such a narrow spectral band, that the brightness within said band 
> exceeds the brightness within the corresponding band of natural 
> white-ish light.

I just think it's weird that colors 120 degrees apart from each other in 
the RYB color wheel always "match", whereas nothing like that exists for 
the RGB color wheel.


Mike


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From: Mike Horvath
Subject: Re: Complementary colours
Date: 30 May 2021 20:18:48
Message: <60b42b68$1@news.povray.org>
On 5/30/2021 8:16 PM, Mike Horvath wrote:
> I just think it's weird that colors 120 degrees apart from each other in 
> the RYB color wheel always "match", whereas nothing like that exists for 
> the RGB color wheel.
> 
> 
> Mike

Though I suppose they could "match" only because we've always been 
shown/told that they "match". I.e. tradition.


Mike


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From: Mike Horvath
Subject: Re: Complementary colours
Date: 30 May 2021 20:29:53
Message: <60b42e01$1@news.povray.org>
On 5/30/2021 9:01 AM, Bald Eagle wrote:
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rt3EAPDn-Ug

I like one of the comments:

"The 440 is tense/uptight. The 432 is richer, deeper and has clarity. 


I would agree 440 sounds a little tinny, less mellow.


Mike


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From: Mike Horvath
Subject: Re: Complementary colours
Date: 30 May 2021 21:06:39
Message: <60b4369f$1@news.povray.org>
On 5/30/2021 9:01 AM, Bald Eagle wrote:
> Until you get into the really wild stuff of which 432 vs 440 is probably only
> the tip of the iceberg. . .
> 
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rt3EAPDn-Ug
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LjR0WpWwLrE
> 
> For a flying pirouette into the deep end, clutch your energy crystals and
> search: Rosslyn Chapel and you'll land firmly into Giza, Angkor Wat, Hypogeum
> territory.
> 
> 
> Meanwhile, decades later, millions are still endlessly amused by "more cowbell!"
> 

When I was heavily into POV, I would see things in terms of shapes and 
colors. Like, "That's a red pyramidal idea!" or "That's so blue cube!" 
Now that I read and write more, I see things in terms of black print on 
white paper; letters and sentences, and words rearranging themselves to 
fit correct grammar. A musician might hear tones and see notes all the 
time. A carpenter, linear forces (such as a hammer hitting a nail) and 
simple geometry. Someone who watches movies a lot might think in terms 
of two-dimensionally projected images. Likewise, people of the New Age 
persuasion have their own language in which they view the world. (And, 
no, language does not just exist in the mouth or written/printed word.)


Mike


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From: Mike Horvath
Subject: Re: Complementary colours
Date: 30 May 2021 21:08:52
Message: <60b43724$1@news.povray.org>
On 5/30/2021 9:06 PM, Mike Horvath wrote:
> Someone who watches movies a lot might think in terms 
> of two-dimensionally projected images.

And light and shadow.


Mike


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From: Mike Horvath
Subject: Re: Complementary colours
Date: 30 May 2021 21:12:16
Message: <60b437f0$1@news.povray.org>
On 5/30/2021 9:06 PM, Mike Horvath wrote:
> When I was heavily into POV, I would see things in terms of shapes and 
> colors. Like, "That's a red pyramidal idea!" or "That's so blue cube!" 
> Now that I read and write more, I see things in terms of black print on 
> white paper; letters and sentences, and words rearranging themselves to 
> fit correct grammar. A musician might hear tones and see notes all the 
> time. A carpenter, linear forces (such as a hammer hitting a nail) and 
> simple geometry. Someone who watches movies a lot might think in terms 
> of two-dimensionally projected images. Likewise, people of the New Age 
> persuasion have their own language in which they view the world. (And, 
> no, language does not just exist in the mouth or written/printed word.)
> 
> 
> Mike

My point is we are shaped by the things we spend most of our days doing, 
or thinking about.


Mike


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