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24 Oct 2021 00:04:45 EDT (-0400)
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From: Chambers
Subject: Re: World Community Grid
Date: 8 Mar 2009 20:27:38
Message: <49b4627a@news.povray.org>
On 3/8/2009 4:25 PM, Nicolas Alvarez wrote:
> I was once able render POV-Ray animations on a thousand computers using the
> same software World Community Grid uses.

I remember you talking about that before; how did it go?

-- 
...Chambers
www.pacificwebguy.com


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From: Nicolas Alvarez
Subject: Re: World Community Grid
Date: 8 Mar 2009 21:57:00
Message: <49b4776b@news.povray.org>
Chambers wrote:
> On 3/8/2009 4:25 PM, Nicolas Alvarez wrote:
>> I was once able render POV-Ray animations on a thousand computers using
>> the same software World Community Grid uses.
> 
> I remember you talking about that before; how did it go?

Went great; then I lost the time, motivation, and free hosting.

Some day, when I don't have so many things going at once, I may resurrect
it, starting from POV3.7 code and/or MCpov.


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From: Mueen Nawaz
Subject: Re: World Community Grid
Date: 9 Mar 2009 01:13:50
Message: <49b4a58e$1@news.povray.org>
Orchid XP v8 wrote:
> ...on the other hand, my PC uses a *maximum* of 650W. It cannot use any
> more power than that. Most of the time, it uses more like 100W. So,
> about as much as a single light bulb. You wanna guess how many light
> bulbs there are in this house??

	Switch to compact fluorescents. A 26W one should provide as much light
as a 100W one.

> And let us not forget, running the kettle uses THREE THOUSAND FIVE
> HUNDRED WATTS. So, at much as 35 light bulbs. I am unable to measure the

	Yes, but the kettle is on for a few minutes.

> Seriously. A PC is not a real high-power device. If you want to lower
> your bills, look for anything that makes stuff hot. (Lighting, heating,
> washing, etc.)

	True - a PC is usually not the first place to reduce energy consumption.

-- 
OK, so what's the speed of dark?


                    /\  /\               /\  /
                   /  \/  \ u e e n     /  \/  a w a z
                       >>>>>>mue### [at] nawazorg<<<<<<
                                   anl


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From: scott
Subject: Re: World Community Grid
Date: 9 Mar 2009 03:57:00
Message: <49b4cbcc@news.povray.org>
> Switch to compact fluorescents. A 26W one should provide as much light
> as a 100W one.

LEDs are the way forward, they are more efficient (and getting more 
efficient the whole time) and more environmentally friendly (they don't 
contain mercury) and fix almost all of the disadvantages CFLs have.  Just 
wait...


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From: Invisible
Subject: Re: World Community Grid
Date: 9 Mar 2009 05:35:08
Message: <49b4e2cc@news.povray.org>
>> Switch to compact fluorescents. A 26W one should provide as much light
>> as a 100W one.
> 
> LEDs are the way forward, they are more efficient (and getting more 
> efficient the whole time) and more environmentally friendly (they don't 
> contain mercury) and fix almost all of the disadvantages CFLs have.  
> Just wait...

I don't know about CFLs, but our house has several "energy saving" 
lighting units. The problem is, there's a 20 minute delay between 
turning them on and being able to see where you're going...

LEDs are indeed efficient, but the main problems currently seem to be 
making "white" light with them, and illuminating large areas.


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From: Invisible
Subject: Re: World Community Grid
Date: 9 Mar 2009 05:37:37
Message: <49b4e361@news.povray.org>
andrel wrote:

> Are you cooking electric? How do you heat your house?

Both of those are gas.

The microwave oven, however, is electronic. I haven't measured it, but 
it's rated at 900W. (I have no idea whether that means it uses 900W of 
juice, or just that it produces 900W of microwave energy.)

> Anyway, there is this problem that your PC may be on for periods much 
> longer that the washing machine.

Like I said, playing CSS (which you're presume is a reasonably intensive 
task) for 2 hours solid used a fraction of one kWh. I don't know what it 
uses if I run the computer for an entire day (presumably it varies by 
the task I set it to do), but I imagine running the washing machine 
several times per day - or accidentally leaving the lights on - uses far 
more power.


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From: scott
Subject: Re: World Community Grid
Date: 9 Mar 2009 06:29:10
Message: <49b4ef76$1@news.povray.org>
> I don't know about CFLs, but our house has several "energy saving" 
> lighting units. The problem is, there's a 20 minute delay between turning 
> them on and being able to see where you're going...

Yup, and not having studied them carefully, I hear they make a slight 
buzzing noise which can be annoying in a quiet room (eg while trying to 
read).

> LEDs are indeed efficient, but the main problems currently seem to be 
> making "white" light with them,

There's no problem with making white light, the most efficient way is just 
to put a mixture of different coloured LEDs in one "lamp" to give whatever 
white temperature you want.  The other way is to put a yellow phosphor 
infront of a blue LED, but that's not as efficient electrically (it means 
you can get white from a single LED though).

> and illuminating large areas.

The biggest problem is keeping the LED temperature low enough during use, 
the designs I've seen have been mainly heat sink, but they seem to have 
overcome that for 60W and 100W equivalent bulbs:

http://www.metaefficient.com/leds/led-light-bulbs.html


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From: Invisible
Subject: Re: World Community Grid
Date: 9 Mar 2009 06:41:00
Message: <49b4f23c$1@news.povray.org>
scott wrote:
>> I don't know about CFLs, but our house has several "energy saving" 
>> lighting units. The problem is, there's a 20 minute delay between 
>> turning them on and being able to see where you're going...
> 
> Yup, and not having studied them carefully, I hear they make a slight 
> buzzing noise which can be annoying in a quiet room (eg while trying to 
> read).

I haven't found that to be a problem yet.

The main problem for me is that they're just not bright enough. I 
actually can't tell what colour my clothes are in the morning because I 
don't have 20 minutes to stand there waiting for the thing to get bright.

>> LEDs are indeed efficient, but the main problems currently seem to be 
>> making "white" light with them,
> 
> There's no problem with making white light, the most efficient way is 
> just to put a mixture of different coloured LEDs in one "lamp" to give 
> whatever white temperature you want.  The other way is to put a yellow 
> phosphor infront of a blue LED, but that's not as efficient electrically 
> (it means you can get white from a single LED though).

OK, I rephrase: I personally have yet to see a "white" LED that wasn't 
actually pale blue.

>> and illuminating large areas.
> 
> The biggest problem is keeping the LED temperature low enough during 
> use, the designs I've seen have been mainly heat sink, but they seem to 
> have overcome that for 60W and 100W equivalent bulbs:
> 
> http://www.metaefficient.com/leds/led-light-bulbs.html

Well, I'm sure the technology won't stand still. IIRC, my dad has some 
small LED ligth fittings illuminating the stairs. But they're not very 
bright. (Despite containing about a dozen LEDs each.)


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From: scott
Subject: Re: World Community Grid
Date: 9 Mar 2009 07:35:10
Message: <49b4feee$1@news.povray.org>
> OK, I rephrase: I personally have yet to see a "white" LED that wasn't 
> actually pale blue.

That's because you're used to "normal" light bulbs that are very very yellow 
(just try taking a photo indoors with the camera on "outdoor" setting and 
you'll see what I mean).  It's not that LED manufacturers can't make this 
colour, it's just there is no demand for it (backlights for LCDs need a much 
bluer white than normal light bulbs).  If you want to make a yellower colour 
yourself then you can make your own yellow phosphor to put on a blue LED, or 
just place some yellow LEDs around the white ones :-)


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From: Invisible
Subject: Re: World Community Grid
Date: 9 Mar 2009 07:42:25
Message: <49b500a1$1@news.povray.org>
scott wrote:
>> OK, I rephrase: I personally have yet to see a "white" LED that wasn't 
>> actually pale blue.
> 
> That's because you're used to "normal" light bulbs that are very very 
> yellow.

How about sunlight? Is that yellow too? (I mean, by the time it reaches 
the ground.)

> It's not that LED manufacturers 
> can't make this colour, it's just there is no demand for it (backlights 
> for LCDs need a much bluer white than normal light bulbs).  If you want 
> to make a yellower colour yourself then you can make your own yellow 
> phosphor to put on a blue LED, or just place some yellow LEDs around the 
> white ones :-)

Heh. The trouble is the light in my room ("energy saving bulb") gives 
off such a pinky yellowy colour that I can't actually tell whether an 
item of clothing is blue or black. :-P


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