POV-Ray : Newsgroups : povray.off-topic : Re: Granite_21 - the final macro Server Time
25 Oct 2021 15:06:50 EDT (-0400)
  Re: Granite_21 - the final macro (Message 1 to 3 of 3)  
From: Cousin Ricky
Subject: Re: Granite_21 - the final macro
Date: 12 Sep 2021 12:32:57
Message: <613e2bb9$1@news.povray.org>
On 2021-09-11 6:09 PM (-4), Samuel B. wrote:
> 
> And there's an area near a river which I suspect might be harboring corundum. In
> that place you can find marble outcrops above an area with granite pegmatite (I
> might have found a green beryl there as a kid but it's been lost). Since I
> figured corundum is sometimes found in marble, and considering the prevalence of
> aluminum in the area (micas, soap stone, etc.), I thought that maybe rubies and
> whatnot could be possible as well.

I was in a jewelry store a few years ago, and saw gems labeled "red
sapphire."  I'm no geologist, so I asked the sales clerk what's the
difference between red sapphire and ruby.  She responded only that ruby
and sapphire are two different gems.  Probing further, I learned that
she didn't realize that ruby and sapphire are both forms of the same
mineral.

So I'm wondering, is it common for retail jewelers not to know the
mineralogy behind the stones they are selling?  Or did she know just
enough to sell them?

(I once ran across the same problem when I attempted to buy a computer
from a locally-owned shop, instead of a big box.  The proprietor most
certainly knew more about computers than your average big box geek, but
his sales clerk knew nothing beyond sales lit talking points.)


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From: Samuel B 
Subject: Re: Granite_21 - the final macro
Date: 12 Sep 2021 16:20:00
Message: <web.613e608ab21f010ccb705ca46e741498@news.povray.org>
Cousin Ricky <ric### [at] yahoocom> wrote:
> On 2021-09-11 6:09 PM (-4), Samuel B. wrote:
> >
> > And there's an area near a river which I suspect might be harboring corundum.
(...)
>
> I was in a jewelry store a few years ago, and saw gems labeled "red
> sapphire."  I'm no geologist, so I asked the sales clerk what's the
> difference between red sapphire and ruby.  She responded only that ruby
> and sapphire are two different gems.  Probing further, I learned that
> she didn't realize that ruby and sapphire are both forms of the same
> mineral.
>
> So I'm wondering, is it common for retail jewelers not to know the
> mineralogy behind the stones they are selling?  Or did she know just
> enough to sell them?

It does seem like she was confused, since ruby and sapphires are indeed both
corundum (aluminum oxide). The main difference between ruby and sapphires, iirc,
is that rubies are red and sapphires can come in many colors. It's possible that
that particular hue of red you saw in the store was not considered a ruby,
similar to how emeralds are just one specific color of beryl, but there can be
other green beryls that are not considered emeralds.

I've never been to any jewelers, but like any other business there are probably
sales clerks working there to just make a wage, so they might not have much
in-depth knowledge regarding their job. (Any there are probably many others who
do know more but are never promoted for whatever reason).

> (I once ran across the same problem when I attempted to buy a computer
> from a locally-owned shop, instead of a big box.  The proprietor most
> certainly knew more about computers than your average big box geek, but
> his sales clerk knew nothing beyond sales lit talking points.)

Fortunately for us we know what to look for. Unfortunately for us, we are often
led to buying parts online that may or may not be up to snuff. Such was the case
with my current rig... it tends to freeze the system when I'm playing certain
resource-intensive games :/

Sam


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From: Thomas de Groot
Subject: Re: Granite_21 - the final macro
Date: 13 Sep 2021 02:26:25
Message: <613eef11@news.povray.org>
Op 12/09/2021 om 22:18 schreef Samuel B.:
> Cousin Ricky <ric### [at] yahoocom> wrote:
>> On 2021-09-11 6:09 PM (-4), Samuel B. wrote:
>>>
>>> And there's an area near a river which I suspect might be harboring corundum.
(...)
>>
>> I was in a jewelry store a few years ago, and saw gems labeled "red
>> sapphire."  I'm no geologist, so I asked the sales clerk what's the
>> difference between red sapphire and ruby.  She responded only that ruby
>> and sapphire are two different gems.  Probing further, I learned that
>> she didn't realize that ruby and sapphire are both forms of the same
>> mineral.
>>
>> So I'm wondering, is it common for retail jewelers not to know the
>> mineralogy behind the stones they are selling?  Or did she know just
>> enough to sell them?
> 

Sam rightly answered this, so just a small additional comment.

I had not really realised it before, but I ran against a similar problem 
when researching for the Granite_21 macro. "commercial" granite names 
can be pointing to something totally different from the "scientific" 
point of view. "marble" is another of those confusing name tags in 
stores it seems.

Humans are great at naming things, and it was often part of (ancient) 
religious practice; knowing the name of something or somebody gave you 
power over it or him/her as it were. The result is more often than not, 
that a bewildering number of names tend to grow like weed.

The scientific community is not immune to this either. Before things 
settle down after a new discovery, the same or similar things are know 
by different names. The history of human palaeontology is a good example.

-- 
Thomas


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