POV-Ray : Newsgroups : povray.general : About that Gamma thing Server Time: 18 Jun 2019 16:39:43 GMT
  About that Gamma thing (Message 1 to 6 of 6)  
From: clipka
Subject: About that Gamma thing
Date: 11 Oct 2017 14:35:27
Message: <59de2c2f$1@news.povray.org>
Not sure if I shared this video on this newsgroup already, but I think
it gives a nice short introduction to why that "gamma" thing matters
(without mentioning the word "gamma", except in a single footnote):

https://youtu.be/LKnqECcg6Gw


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From: Stephen
Subject: Re: About that Gamma thing
Date: 11 Oct 2017 15:34:10
Message: <59de39f2$1@news.povray.org>
On 11/10/2017 15:35, clipka wrote:
> Not sure if I shared this video on this newsgroup already, but I think
> it gives a nice short introduction to why that "gamma" thing matters
> (without mentioning the word "gamma", except in a single footnote):
> 
> https://youtu.be/LKnqECcg6Gw
> 

Very interesting. Thanks.

-- 

Regards
     Stephen


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From: Sven Littkowski
Subject: Re: About that Gamma thing
Date: 11 Oct 2017 17:17:27
Message: <59de5227$1@news.povray.org>
On 11.10.2017 11:34, Stephen wrote:
> On 11/10/2017 15:35, clipka wrote:
>> Not sure if I shared this video on this newsgroup already, but I think
>> it gives a nice short introduction to why that "gamma" thing matters
>> (without mentioning the word "gamma", except in a single footnote):
>>
>> https://youtu.be/LKnqECcg6Gw
>>
> 
> Very interesting. Thanks.
> 
Same here: very interesting, thanks for the insight, Clipka. Well
appreciated.

---
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From: Warren
Subject: Re: About that Gamma thing
Date: 15 Oct 2017 12:45:01
Message: <web.59e357bbcf9bb4e2ca73ee9d0@news.povray.org>
clipka <ano### [at] anonymousorg> wrote:
> Not sure if I shared this video on this newsgroup already, but I think
> it gives a nice short introduction to why that "gamma" thing matters
> (without mentioning the word "gamma", except in a single footnote):
>
> https://youtu.be/LKnqECcg6Gw

Interesting. I had already learned in Pov wiki that a human being doesn't
perceive the real world colors in a linear way, but I wasn't aware about what is
explained at the very beginning (the dark boundaries, when not taking gamma into
account and blurring an image).


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From: Kenneth
Subject: Re: About that Gamma thing
Date: 15 Oct 2017 13:25:00
Message: <web.59e35fcbcf9bb4e289df8d30@news.povray.org>
Really interesting--and a lot of info crammed into a short time-frame! (I wish I
could think and 'comprehend' that fast.)

I actually never took notice of the 'dark blending' that occurs between colors,
when blurring a colorful image in Photoshop (using its default gamma of 2.2).
VERY surprising and enlightening.

The 'perceived brightness of colors/grays' demonstration doesn't just apply to
computer monitors. I recently bought a super-bright multi-color LED 'stage
light' for use in the musical group I play in-- one of those lights with lots of
individual LEDs. It has a dimming function (all the way from full-on to
full-off, in 256 steps-- simple digital steps, probably.) The trouble is, most
of the *perceived* brightness change happens at the lower dimmed-down end-- just
like the video explains. Apparently, the designers of this light didn't take
into account the perceived-brightness phenomenon; they should have applied
something like a 2.2 power-law to the brightness steps.


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From: Alain
Subject: Re: About that Gamma thing
Date: 15 Oct 2017 20:10:58
Message: <59e3c0d2@news.povray.org>
Le 17-10-15 à 09:21, Kenneth a écrit :
> Really interesting--and a lot of info crammed into a short time-frame! (I wish I
> could think and 'comprehend' that fast.)
> 
> I actually never took notice of the 'dark blending' that occurs between colors,
> when blurring a colorful image in Photoshop (using its default gamma of 2.2).
> VERY surprising and enlightening.
> 
> The 'perceived brightness of colors/grays' demonstration doesn't just apply to
> computer monitors. I recently bought a super-bright multi-color LED 'stage
> light' for use in the musical group I play in-- one of those lights with lots of
> individual LEDs. It has a dimming function (all the way from full-on to
> full-off, in 256 steps-- simple digital steps, probably.) The trouble is, most
> of the *perceived* brightness change happens at the lower dimmed-down end-- just
> like the video explains. Apparently, the designers of this light didn't take
> into account the perceived-brightness phenomenon; they should have applied
> something like a 2.2 power-law to the brightness steps.
> 
> 

Just another place where gamma considerations hit you unexpectedly...


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