POV-Ray : Newsgroups : povray.windows : GPU Server Time: 19 Oct 2019 09:32:55 GMT
  GPU (Message 1 to 8 of 8)  
From: Tamas Gunda
Subject: GPU
Date: 11 May 2011 08:40:01
Message: <web.4dca4b062b2eba78b677d1e90@news.povray.org>
When checking the CPU and graphics card performances, temperatures etc. while a
picture is being rendered I realized that when the render window is hidden or
POVray is minimized, the GPU is still working with full throttle. CPU is always
about 100%, this is OK. But why the GPU, too? I'm not an expert of hardware so
sorry for the question.


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From: nemesis
Subject: Re: GPU
Date: 11 May 2011 11:00:00
Message: <web.4dca6b54eed3d57a9a1bcfb90@news.povray.org>
"Tamas Gunda" <gen### [at] yahoocom> wrote:
> When checking the CPU and graphics card performances, temperatures etc. while a
> picture is being rendered I realized that when the render window is hidden or
> POVray is minimized, the GPU is still working with full throttle. CPU is always
> about 100%, this is OK. But why the GPU, too? I'm not an expert of hardware so
> sorry for the question.

Surely some mistake.  Everyone knows povray is a CPU-only math surfaces
raytracer and GPU is just for games...


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From: SGeier
Subject: Re: GPU
Date: 11 May 2011 18:16:39
Message: <4dcad287$1@news.povray.org>
"nemesis" <nam### [at] gmailcom> wrote in message 
news:web.4dca6b54eed3d57a9a1bcfb90@news.povray.org...
> "Tamas Gunda" <gen### [at] yahoocom> wrote:
>> When checking the CPU and graphics card performances, temperatures etc. 
>> while a
>> picture is being rendered I realized that when the render window is 
>> hidden or
>> POVray is minimized, the GPU is still working with full throttle. CPU is 
>> always
>> about 100%, this is OK. But why the GPU, too? I'm not an expert of 
>> hardware so
>> sorry for the question.

The obvious questions in my head would be:

1) How are you measuring GPU utilization (and could that method be misled 
somehow) and
2) What else is running on your computer (i.e. what happens when POV-Ray is 
off)

> Surely some mistake.  Everyone knows povray is a CPU-only math surfaces
> raytracer and GPU is just for games...

No.


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From: Tamas Gunda
Subject: Re: GPU
Date: 12 May 2011 08:05:01
Message: <web.4dcb93b6eed3d57ab677d1e90@news.povray.org>
"SGeier" <som### [at] somewherecom> wrote:
> "nemesis" <nam### [at] gmailcom> wrote in message
> news:web.4dca6b54eed3d57a9a1bcfb90@news.povray.org...
> > "Tamas Gunda" <gen### [at] yahoocom> wrote:
> >> When checking the CPU and graphics card performances, temperatures etc.
> >> while a
> >> picture is being rendered I realized that when the render window is
> >> hidden or
> >> POVray is minimized, the GPU is still working with full throttle. CPU is
> >> always
> >> about 100%, this is OK. But why the GPU, too? I'm not an expert of
> >> hardware so
> >> sorry for the question.
>
> The obvious questions in my head would be:
>
> 1) How are you measuring GPU utilization (and could that method be misled
> somehow) and
> 2) What else is running on your computer (i.e. what happens when POV-Ray is
> off)
>
> > Surely some mistake.  Everyone knows povray is a CPU-only math surfaces
> > raytracer and GPU is just for games...
>
> No.

I use the Open Hardware Monitor utility (http://openhardwaremonitor.org/) that
among others shows the CPU and GPU performances, etc. When POVray is rendering,
the GPU temperature clearly raises by about 15 deg.


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From: Darren New
Subject: Re: GPU
Date: 12 May 2011 16:19:59
Message: <4dcc08af@news.povray.org>
On 5/12/2011 1:00, Tamas Gunda wrote:
> the GPU temperature clearly raises by about 15 deg.

How much does the CPU temperature go up? Could it be spill-over heat?

-- 
Darren New, San Diego CA, USA (PST)
   "Coding without comments is like
    driving without turn signals."


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From: clipka
Subject: Re: GPU
Date: 13 May 2011 07:35:34
Message: <4dccdf46$1@news.povray.org>
Am 12.05.2011 18:19, schrieb Darren New:
> On 5/12/2011 1:00, Tamas Gunda wrote:
>> the GPU temperature clearly raises by about 15 deg.
>
> How much does the CPU temperature go up? Could it be spill-over heat?

Sounds line the most plausible thing to me; POV-Ray typically gives the 
CPU a pretty hot time; if airflow in the casing is poor, the GPU cooler 
will breathe in hot air, greatly reducing its efficiency.


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From: Tamas Gunda
Subject: Re: GPU
Date: 13 May 2011 08:30:00
Message: <web.4dccead9eed3d57ab677d1e90@news.povray.org>
clipka <ano### [at] anonymousorg> wrote:
> Am 12.05.2011 18:19, schrieb Darren New:
> > On 5/12/2011 1:00, Tamas Gunda wrote:
> >> the GPU temperature clearly raises by about 15 deg.
> >
> > How much does the CPU temperature go up? Could it be spill-over heat?
>
> Sounds line the most plausible thing to me; POV-Ray typically gives the
> CPU a pretty hot time; if airflow in the casing is poor, the GPU cooler
> will breathe in hot air, greatly reducing its efficiency.

Good point. To check this assumption I started some very computation-demanding
quantum chemistry calculations without graphics, and it also raised the GPU
temperature by about 14-15 deg C.
Obviously this is very hardware-depending. You may want to check it in your
compy. The above mentioned Open Hardware Monitor is very friendly, it does not
install anything, you have simply to copy
it to somewhere and start the exe file.


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From: Alain
Subject: Re: GPU
Date: 14 May 2011 02:25:08
Message: <4dcde804$1@news.povray.org>
Le 2011/05/13 04:26, Tamas Gunda a écrit :
> clipka<ano### [at] anonymousorg>  wrote:
>> Am 12.05.2011 18:19, schrieb Darren New:
>>> On 5/12/2011 1:00, Tamas Gunda wrote:
>>>> the GPU temperature clearly raises by about 15 deg.
>>>
>>> How much does the CPU temperature go up? Could it be spill-over heat?
>>
>> Sounds line the most plausible thing to me; POV-Ray typically gives the
>> CPU a pretty hot time; if airflow in the casing is poor, the GPU cooler
>> will breathe in hot air, greatly reducing its efficiency.
>
> Good point. To check this assumption I started some very computation-demanding
> quantum chemistry calculations without graphics, and it also raised the GPU
> temperature by about 14-15 deg C.
> Obviously this is very hardware-depending. You may want to check it in your
> compy. The above mentioned Open Hardware Monitor is very friendly, it does not
> install anything, you have simply to copy
> it to somewhere and start the exe file.
>
>
>
>

A simple kludge that can help you in this case:
Using some light cardboard or heavy paper, and some glue, make a duckt 
going between the fan of the video card and some opening of the case 
from whitch it can get fresh air.
Next, place another peice as a wall between the CPU and the video card 
to force the heated air away from the card.

You may also make a funel connecting to the CPU fan to help limit it 
re-aspiring it own heated air. Fashion it so that it goes toward some 
opening in the case or an intake fan.
Using that, I made my CPU run about 10° to 15°C cooler without changing 
anything else...
If you use corrugated cardboard, it's also somewhat effective at 
reducing the noise level a little.



Alain


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