POV-Ray : Newsgroups : povray.binaries.images : New Year's Greetings from Kallipyros! Server Time: 17 Jan 2019 02:26:17 GMT
  New Year's Greetings from Kallipyros! (Message 1 to 8 of 8)  
From: Jörg "Yadgar" Bleimann
Subject: New Year's Greetings from Kallipyros!
Date: 3 Jan 2019 15:30:15
Message: <5c2e2a87@news.povray.org>
Hi(gh)!

In the outer reaches of the Solar System, an intriguing object floats 
through the darkness of space: Kallipyros, a strange spherical asteroid 
famous for its incredibly intense cryovolcanism, even observable from 
orbital telecopes around Earth. In 1996, the POVghan space agency 
launched a probe to explore this strange celestial body that finally has 
arrived in an orbit around Kallipyros. From received altimetry data, a 
prelimary model of the asteroid has been constructed to be showed here.

See you in Khyberspace!

Yadgar


Post a reply to this message


Attachments:
Download 'test2-136.png' (450 KB)

Preview of image 'test2-136.png'
test2-136.png


 

From: Thomas de Groot
Subject: Re: New Year's Greetings from Kallipyros!
Date: 4 Jan 2019 07:41:45
Message: <5c2f0e39$1@news.povray.org>
On 3-1-2019 16:31, Jörg "Yadgar" Bleimann wrote:
> Hi(gh)!
> 
> In the outer reaches of the Solar System, an intriguing object floats 
> through the darkness of space: Kallipyros, a strange spherical asteroid 
> famous for its incredibly intense cryovolcanism, even observable from 
> orbital telecopes around Earth. In 1996, the POVghan space agency 
> launched a probe to explore this strange celestial body that finally has 
> arrived in an orbit around Kallipyros. From received altimetry data, a 
> prelimary model of the asteroid has been constructed to be showed here.
> 
> See you in Khyberspace!
> 
> Yadgar


Now, beat that, Ultima Thule!  ;-)

-- 
Thomas


Post a reply to this message

From: jr
Subject: Re: New Year's Greetings from Kallipyros!
Date: 4 Jan 2019 12:15:01
Message: <web.5c2f4d0922373b7848892b50@news.povray.org>
hi,

=?UTF-8?Q?J=c3=b6rg_=22Yadgar=22_Bleimann?= <yaz### [at] gmxde> wrote:
> Hi(gh)!
> In the outer reaches of the Solar System, an intriguing object floats
> through the darkness of space: Kallipyros, a strange spherical asteroid
> famous for its incredibly intense cryovolcanism, ... From received
>  altimetry data, a prelimary model of the asteroid has been constructed ...

looking at the "data" it seems that the "volcanoes" are congregating nearest the
probe.  a sign of .. imminent danger?  :-)

enjoyed image + story.


regards, jr.


Post a reply to this message

From: Kenneth
Subject: Re: New Year's Greetings from Kallipyros!
Date: 4 Jan 2019 21:25:00
Message: <web.5c2fcecd22373b78cd98345b0@news.povray.org>
Mountains of water-ice, for future explorers to make use of! Or is it
bad-tasting solid methane and ammonia??

Nice image.


Post a reply to this message

From: Jörg "Yadgar" Bleimann
Subject: Re: New Year's Greetings from Kallipyros!
Date: 5 Jan 2019 00:55:43
Message: <5c30008f@news.povray.org>
Hi(gh)!

On 04.01.19 22:23, Kenneth wrote:
> Mountains of water-ice, for future explorers to make use of! Or is it
> bad-tasting solid methane and ammonia??

Properly speaking, it's not even an asteroid, but something like a 
failed neutron star - with towering starquake eruptions every 1/25 
second, much too violent to make it a second home for cheelas!

But then I calculated that using the whole 35-minute fireworks sequence 
(hence its name "Kallipyros", meaning "beautiful fire") as a basis for 
generating meshes would result in a cool 130-days rendering time... 
definitely too much for me, as I have other projects running 
simultaneously and occupying CPU time.

Perhaps I'll stay with this one mesh and instead try out navigation on 
the surface of a spherical object - an exercise of which also my other 
hibernating POV-Ray project like Ghurghusht, Whatmough and of course 
Khyberspace would benefit!

See you in Khyberspace!

Yadgar


Post a reply to this message

From: Paolo Gibellini
Subject: Re: New Year's Greetings from Kallipyros!
Date: 7 Jan 2019 16:46:48
Message: <5c338278$1@news.povray.org>
Jörg "Yadgar" Bleimann wrote on 03/01/2019 16:31:
> Hi(gh)!
> 
> In the outer reaches of the Solar System, an intriguing object floats 
> through the darkness of space: Kallipyros, a strange spherical asteroid 
> famous for its incredibly intense cryovolcanism, even observable from 
> orbital telecopes around Earth. In 1996, the POVghan space agency 
> launched a probe to explore this strange celestial body that finally has 
> arrived in an orbit around Kallipyros. From received altimetry data, a 
> prelimary model of the asteroid has been constructed to be showed here.
> 
> See you in Khyberspace!
> 
> Yadgar
Ha ha... greetings,
    Paolo


Post a reply to this message

From: Jörg "Yadgar" Bleimann
Subject: Re: New Year's Greetings from Kallipyros!
Date: 9 Jan 2019 00:00:55
Message: <5c3539b7@news.povray.org>
Hi(gh)!

Here also views of the north and south pole of Kallipyros - its axis is 
tilted by 90°, so each pole is in full sunlight once per year!

Next thing will be views from low orbits above its surface... and I 
should think about naming the most prominent terrain features!

See you in Khyberspace!

Yadgar


Post a reply to this message


Attachments:
Download '2019-01-07 kallipyros, north polar region.png' (275 KB)
Download '2019-01-07 kallipyros, south polar region.png' (211 KB)

Preview of image '2019-01-07 kallipyros, north polar region.png'
2019-01-07 kallipyros, north polar region.png

Preview of image '2019-01-07 kallipyros, south polar region.png'
2019-01-07 kallipyros, south polar region.png


 

From: Thomas de Groot
Subject: Re: New Year's Greetings from Kallipyros!
Date: 9 Jan 2019 07:37:45
Message: <5c35a4c9$1@news.povray.org>
On 9-1-2019 1:02, Jörg "Yadgar" Bleimann wrote:
> Hi(gh)!
> 
> Here also views of the north and south pole of Kallipyros - its axis is 
> tilted by 90°, so each pole is in full sunlight once per year!
> 
> Next thing will be views from low orbits above its surface... and I 
> should think about naming the most prominent terrain features!
> 

Aaaah! You stir up memories! In 1976, while teaching at the University 
of Algiers, I thought up a planet with a 90 degree tilt. Imagining what 
life would be like the year round. My planet was a watery world where 
the inhabitants would migrate from pole to pole to escape the fierce 
winters and, assumedly, the violent storms generated at the terminator.

-- 
Thomas


Post a reply to this message

Copyright 2003-2008 Persistence of Vision Raytracer Pty. Ltd.